Trucking Accidents

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The trucking industry is strictly regulated by state and federal government agencies to ensure that trucks and their drivers operate safely.  The number of hours a driver may be on the road each day, how much weight a truck may haul, and equipment maintenance, are just some of the areas regulated.  Unlike drivers of personal vehicles, truckers must keep logs and closely account for their time.

There may be many responsible parties to a truck accident.  Fleet owners, drivers, truck manufacturers, and road maintenance crews may share some of the blame. This often makes properly filing your claim for a truck accident more complex than an accident between private passenger vehicles.

When something goes wrong and an accident occurs involving a vehicle operated by a large trucking company, an insurance rep and a forensic engineering expert are oftentimes at the scene before the accident is even cleared from the roadway.  If you or a loved one has been injured or killed in a trucking accident, you need your own representatives and experts at the scene of the wreck as quickly as possible.

At RDU Injury Law, we have numerous experts on stand-by to send to the scene of the crash within minutes of us being hired. Through our fast action and thorough investigation, we have obtained significant seven figure recoveries for our clients. Other lawyers associate our firm to work with them on their significant truck accident cases.

To demonstrate this point (and the thoroughness of our work), below is one of our recent results reported in the Summer of 2017 Edition of the magazine Trial Briefs, which is published by the North Carolina Plaintiff’s Bar (NCAJ):

Robby Jessup and Joan Davis [of RDU Injury Law] in Raleigh, in association with Russell Johnson of the law firm Diener Law in Greenville, obtained a One Million Dollar Settlement in a disputed liability wrongful death case. These attorneys represented the estate of a Mexican immigrant who was killed in a head-on collision with a transfer truck.  The truck driver and trucking company initiated the lawsuit by asserting claims against the estate for personal injury and property damage.  The estate proceeded to counterclaim for wrongful death. The State Troopers and initial experts who investigated the crash all said that the Mexican immigrant was at fault for causing the wreck and had crossed the center line.  In fact, in the incident report, the investigating officer indicated that he suspected alcohol was a factor in the wreck. The family of the decedent reported that he had just left for work approximately fifteen minutes before the wreck and was sober. The autopsy confirmed that the decedent was not under the influence of alcohol. After investigating the claims, an eyewitness to the crash was discovered who had called 911 (but who had not spoken to law enforcement at the scene).  This eyewitness reported that it was the truck driver who crossed the center line and caused the wreck, not the Mexican immigrant.  In discovery, it was found that the truck driver had a revoked driver’s license at the time of the wreck, and had a driving history that disqualified him from employment as a commercial driver.  Surveillance videos of the truck driver (taken by the trucking company’s workers comp carrier) also came to light that cast serious doubt on his claimed injuries. Policy limits for the trucking company of $1,000,000 were paid at mediation with Bill King in April of 2017.”

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